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I have recently started to drink a lot more chinese tea and less Nespresso coffee. Pete and Francis gave me some good stuff recently so I thought that I would start a thread to see what people are drinking and where they get it from. Currently, I drink the following:

 

Various Tie Guan Yin teas (a form of oolong tea) imported from China. Most were gifts My favourite is Yuxiangzhen brand http://www.yuxiangzhen.com/tea.asp although the Ying Fa that Pete and Francis gave me was pretty good too. TWG in Singapore also sells a Tie Guan Yin in the shape of a large ball that opens up like a flower when you steep it. Its not bad but the ones that are individually vacum packed are better.

 

Jasmine Tea. I have a few, but my favourite is from Wang San Yang Tea Merchant in Upper Cross Street. They also have branches in Vivo City and Ion. The highest grade of Jasmine is very fragrant.

 

I also bought some 5-yr old Pu Er (Poh Le in Cantonese) tea from Wang San. It comes in a 400g round biscuit and can be brewed and brewed over and over again. Its much smoother than the Pu Ers that you get say in the Bak Kut Teh stalls.

 

I also drink some Green Teas. Generally I prefer the fermented teas, but sometimes I feel like a change.

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I got the habit of drinking Chinese tea from my days in Shanghai. I like the green teas and the white teas are spectacular. Good teas are not cheap though.

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I'm a chinese tea freak! :) was into it since i was 13.

 

i spent half my life drinking green chinese teas and eventually developed a love for wuyi teas.

 

TKY is a hit and miss sometimes. too much commercialization has resulted in the deterioration of what TKY really is, a lot taste like vegetable sap or some over roasted teas. TKY comes in predominantly 3 manufacturing styles, the 清香,浓香,玉香 styles. The first, is my preferred style, but very difficult to get real fresh, real fragrant 清香 TKY. This style has a low oxidation, flowery and fruity, but no greeness, no smoky roasting etc. Requires premium leaf stock, careful 杀青,careful oxidation, careful drying and eventually proper packaging, else over time or exposure to air, the qualities are lost.

 

浓香 is bolder, more heavily oxidised and many times roasted, with several degrees of roasting. This is probably the more common TKYs that you can find everywhere in singapore in all corners.

 

玉香 is the lowest oxidation of all, almost a green tea like, fresh, lush and green, with light hints of florals but i personally dont like it, others do.

 

i have still a bit of some very good 清香 TKY left, the best i've ever tasted, stored in nitrogen. maybe some day when there is a hifi/chinese tea appreciation gathering i might bring it out :D i also have a pack of vacumned sealed 5gram TKY sample that my boss gave to me, a gift given by some bigshot.

 

pu-erh tea was formerly a love of mine but a short term one because I was increasingly disappointed with the tea qualities exported by china. tea factories go round all different areas to collect leaf stock, mix and match and press into tea cakes.. i still have about 10kg+ green puerh tea cakes that i collected in 2003. i've some good aged pu-erhs from the 20-30 year range that i collected before the sky rocketed~ 500-800%.. but it became increasing subjective as more and more "old" tea cakes surfaced.. but age is not a guarantee to good taste ;P proper storage is still the key..

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I love 16 yrs old Pu Er... so mellow and smooth. One taste and I got hooked and now can't stand anything younger as the taste is so different. Unfortunately, we would probably have to sell a kidney to get a cake of it in Singapore if you can find it that is.

 

It is so much more affordable in China and I got mine during a trip to Yunnan. That is one local goods that is a must for a trip to Yunnan. The big-leave Pu Er is only grown in Yunnan and makes the best Pu Er tea. Pu Er is the only tea that will appreciate in value with age and gets better as it ages.

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Some nice Bi luo chun.. bi luo chun from dong ting lake is the original, and premium. many nearby areas in suzhou do produce BLC, but lack the fruity, floral taste, instead such teas have more of a greener/beanier taste.

 

 

 

 

Some decent dragonwell / long jing, but unfortunately after the rains. this year's produce was not good due to an extended winter. good dragon well must have uniform leaf sizes, no broken bits, a sparrow tongue, i.e. one bud, one leaf. color when brewed must be lush, bright green as a sign of freshness, brew is a very pale faint yellow. deeper yellows are hints of oxidation.

 

 

 

 

 

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I love 16 yrs old Pu Er... so mellow and smooth. One taste and I got hooked and now can't stand anything younger as the taste is so different. Unfortunately, we would probably have to sell a kidney to get a cake of it in Singapore if you can find it that is.

 

It is so much more affordable in China and I got mine during a trip to Yunnan. That is one local goods that is a must for a trip to Yunnan. The big-leave Pu Er is only grown in Yunnan and makes the best Pu Er tea. Pu Er is the only tea that will appreciate in value with age and gets better as it ages.

yup you are right. Big Leaf Pu-erh is the best for aging. they come from tall tea trees, some over a thousand years old. those that come from trees are known as 乔木 pu-erh tea.

 

pu-erh is divided between green and black pu-erh. green puerh is the original pu-erh tea, where green tea leaves, harvested are pressed into tea cakes and aged over time, to give a reddish mellow brew. in 1972 black pu-erh was first produced from forced oxidation by water and temperature treatment of tea leaves/tea cakes. however the result of this process is not consistent, and the taste is not very good, so some peopel do age black pu-erh for a few years to let it mellow out and less musty, earthy tasting. green pu-erh needs to age for 10+ years before the brew is considered "drinkable", although very high grade green pu-erh tea leaves on its own at any time is quite good, rich, fragrant etc, minus the astringency and bitterness that needs to be tolerated.

 

i have some 80's guang yun gong bing

 

 

and some 70's zhong cha tie bing

 

 

the rest of the tea cakes i have are still not of the age for drinking although i have this 乔木早春一牙 1kg tea cake that i shake it annually for some leaf to enjoy

 

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Glad you found the tea nice bro...

 

I like green tea, but will also enjoy good Chinese tea.

I bought good teapots for the job, and drink a cup or more each day - more like a pot!

 

From Jiu Fen in Taipei District

 

 

Flower tea in Beijing  - remember to wash the leaves! Nice to look at, but not too tasty...

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Quite pleased to find some enthusiasts here like vajrasattvasg. Am now sipping some Jasmine tea in my office. I know its not for purist, but I like it and everyone who comes in comments about the nice smell. I've had some fantastic Pu Erhs in Hong Kong restaurants. My puny 5-yr old "black" pu erh is quite good but perhaps I'll go back to Wang San for some of the older stuff.

 

I know there is lots of tea in China :), but where to find the good stuff in Singapore?

 

Also storage in Singapore. I keep my Pu Erh and green teas in a vacum container in the cupboard, but the TKY and Jasmine teas go in the fridge. Is that correct?

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Just got back from WuYi San, Fujian last week. There are 2 local specialities that one grow from the rock n the other from the stream. Personally, I like all types of tea n each time I go for trips n I like to buy some.

 

Regards

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I too began drinking green tea during my numerous visits to Hangzhou. My staff would buy all these Long Xing" tea from there which I still have and drink.  I can't read Chinese so can't tell you brand but they always come in nice looking packages in  tin boxes. It is great especially now in cold weather here. But it is also a diuretic and no fun going to loo in the cold. lol :D

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Nice thread. Took up tea drinking ever since my posting to Shanghai. At work, in winter my daily brew would usually be the dark pu-erh (8yr variant) or longjing. In summer I will alternate between the pu-erh and chrysanthemum with wolfberries added.

 

For leisure I also drink longjing and jasmine.

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